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Archive for April, 2012

Published in The Atlantic on Tuesday, April 3, 2012. Read the full article here. An excerpt is pasted below.

A man ponders a potato chip purchase in an East Harlem bodega. Photo credit: Sarika Bansal

“Healthy food in bodegas?” asked Ibrahim Hilou, owner of a convenience store in Central Harlem. “You’re wasting your time. Go 96th and down. Over here, they like it sweet. I made a coffee today with eight sugars.”

Like most bodegas in New York City, Hilou’s store is relatively small — the customer area measures about 400 square feet — and its shelves are stocked with non-perishable goods like potato chips and canned soup. The refrigerators are filled with artificially sweetened beverages, full fat milk, and beer. A counter sells hot sandwiches lathered with mayonnaise and cheese. The register is decorated with lottery tickets and candy bars.

Meanwhile, in a neglected corner, a self-standing metal shelf contains an assortment of fruits and vegetables. The bananas are overly ripe and the potatoes are of poor quality. Few people buy produce in Hilou’s shop; most of the onions end up in breakfast sandwiches, the store’s most profitable product.

New York City has over 10,000 bodegas like Hilou’s. In some New York neighborhoods, particularly lower income ones, bodegas are often the default option for groceries. In parts of Brooklyn, they comprise over 80 percent of food retail (PDF).

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